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Pregnant Baltimore Oriole Feeding in The Pouring Rain West Island Fairhaven MA Add Video

EVEN ON MOTHER'S DAY - A MOM'S WORK IS NEVER DONE A cold pouring rain with a 42 degree temperature didn't stop this future mom - a Baltimore Oriole, from feeding on what was left of oranges on our West Island deck - this raw Mother's Day 2019. The temperature was 42F and a wind chill of 33 degrees. The wind was out of the northeast at 19, gusting to 25MPH. More raw weather on the way with signs of hope for a fantastic Memorial Day weekend. No promises - but the potential is looking good. Enjoy the relaxation of this clip with the natural sounds of the rain captured with our enhanced nature microphones. Baltimore orioles are basically solitary outside their mating season. The species is generally considered monogamous, although evidence suggests that extra-pair copulation is reasonably common. In the spring, males establish a territory then display to females by singing and chattering while hopping from perch to perch in front of them. Males also give a bow display, bowing with wings lowered and tail fanned. Depending on their receptiveness, the females may ignore these displays or sing and give calls or a wing-quiver display in response. The wing-quiver display involves leaning forward, often with tail partly fanned, and fluttering or quivering slightly lowered wings. The Baltimore oriole's nest is built by the female. It is a tightly woven pouch located on the end of a branch, consisting of any plant or animal materials available, hanging down on the underside. Trees such as elms, cottonwoods, maples, willows or apples are regularly selected, with the nest usually located around 7 to 9 m (23 to 30 ft) above the ground. The female lays three to seven eggs, with the norm being around four. The eggs are pale gray to bluish white, measuring 2.3 cm 1.6 cm (0.91 in 0.63 in) on average. The incubation period is 12 to 14 days. Once the nestlings hatch, they are fed by regurgitation by both parents and brooded by the female for two weeks. After this the young start to fledge, becoming largely independent shortly thereafter. If the eggs, young, or nest are destroyed, the oriole is unable to lay a replacement clutch/ Source: Wikipedia Video by MLBaron for westislandweather.com

Posted by MLBaron on May 12, 2019 at 7:35 PM 41 Views

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