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  • New Bedford-Fairhaven Hurricane Barrier
    by MLBaron on January 29, 2010 at 7:21 AM
    1930 Views - 0 Comments

    A luxury cruiser sails out of the harbor through the 150ft wide channel of the New Bedford-Fairhaven Hurricane Barrier. Completed in 1966 it has yet to be given the ultimate test to withstand a Category 3 Hurricane for which it was designed for. Hurricane Bob struck here on August 19, 1991 as a Category 2 system. The dike kept out 6.8 feet of tidal surge from the inner harbor.

  • A Seatrade Freighter enters New Bedford ...
    by MLBaron on January 29, 2010 at 6:35 AM
    1704 Views - 0 Comments

    A SeaTrade freighter enters New Bedford Harbor. New Bedford PD and Environmental Police Patrol boats monitored the entry of this ship. It then tied up on the north side of the New Bedford-Fairhaven Bridge. This ship is a routine visitor to New Bedford. Sunday, Oct 26, 2008. This medium sized freighter had two tugs assisther to the north side of the NB-FHVN Bridge to tie up. This ship is aregular visitor to the New Bedford Harbor. By BECKY W. EVANSStandard-Times staff writerNovember 30, 2008 6:00 AMMost Viewed Stories * India violence hits home * Fire on Tremont Streetcauses minor damage * Police arrest two New Bedford teens for West Endarmed robbery, car chase * Wallet found, turned in at Rite Aid * Harbordredging shows good results as more, bigger cargo ships turn to NewBedford's port * Federal judge rules that state's ban against Internetwine sales is discriminatory * Black Friday in SouthCoast: 'It wascrazy'Just as the city's majestic whaling ships once loomed large on thewaterfront, another type of vessel is drawing attention to New BedfordHarbor and helping to stimulate the local economy.Welcome to the age of the refrigerated cargo vessel.As many as 12 of the vessels, which measure about 450 feet in lengthoverall, are expected to arrive in port this winter (three have alreadycome and gone). The massive ships, known as "reefers," will be carryingclementines, oranges and other citrus fruit grown in Morocco and boundfor buyers in Toronto, Montreal and the Canadian Maritimes.Each vessel will unload its cargo at Maritime Terminal Inc., creatingabout 50 jobs for longshoremen and warehouse workers, said PierreBernier, who manages the freight forwarding division at thecold-storage facility on MacArthur Boulevard.More than 1,100 trucks will visit the terminal over the next threemonths to load and transport the fruit to Canada, he said.About five of the 12 vessels will create additional jobs when they arerestocked with frozen herring and mackerel caught by New Bedfordfishermen and processed locally, Mr. Bernier said. The vessels willcarry the exports back across the Atlantic to Western Africa, he said.The vessels' port presence will be felt throughout the local economyfrom gear and repair shops to ice and fuel docks, said Kristin Decas,executive director of the New Bedford Harbor Development Commission."They will contribute to economic growth through the use of ouramenities here in the port. Whether it's the support services or therestaurants ... it's just a real win for the port," Ms. Decas said.When the refrigerated cargo vessel Cape Belle broke down in BuzzardsBay earlier this month, a local tug boat towed the ship into port forrepair. Overall, the incident probably contributed $50,000 to the localeconomy, Mr. Bernier said.He estimates that each reefer that makes a port call injects about $1million into the New Bedford economy.Attracting refrigerated cargo vessels to the port is "an importantcomponent of our effort at trying to expand import and export trade,"Ms. Decas said.The HDC is working on a report that will quantify the economic impactof the port's current maritime activities, she said. It also willoutline economic opportunities in global and domestic markets that theport could capitalize on in the future.A three-phase navigational dredging project (the third phase is likelyto begin in late December) in New Bedford Harbor has paved the way forthe refrigerated cargo vessels, which draw 20 to 24 feet of water.The first and second phases of the state-funded project, which began inJanuary 2005, restored the depth of the federal channel and other partsof the harbor to 30 feet. Decades of accumulated sediment and toxicsludge had made parts of the harbor too difficult for large vessels tonavigate."It brought the channel to the necessary depth to accommodate thesecargo ships," Ms. Decas said. "It increased our competitiveness in theglobal market."The city is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to develop aplan for dredging shallow portions of the federal channel in the outerharbor and Buzzards Bay. Ms. Decas said the goal is to make the depthof the shipping lanes consistent with the 30-foot depth of the innerharbor. Currently, refrigerated cargo ships must occasionally waitfor the tide to rise so they have enough water to navigate the channelin the outer harbor, she said.Due in part to dredging, refrigerated cargo vessel traffic at MaritimeTerminal is growing, Mr. Bernier said. The company's shipping programincreased 35 percent from last year, he said, noting that about 5 morevessels will make port calls this year.New Bedford competes for the vessels with the ports of Wilmington, Del.and Philadelphia. The Whaling City has an edge on the competition,however, given its closer location to Morocco and Canada, Mr. Berniersaid.He credited Teamsters Union Local 59 and Longshoremen's Union Local ILA1413 for supplying a capable labor force that helps make the portcompetitive."We have a good setup with them," he said. "They do a really good job."Philip Sullivan, vice president and business agent for New Bedford'slocal Teamsters, said the union has about 14 workers employed atMaritime Terminal's warehouse during the shipping season. He said thework brought in by the cargo ships allows the workers to earn a lot ofovertime pay "just in time for Christmas." It takes one to three daysto unload the fruit from the refrigerated cargo vessels."You try to unload it as quickly as possible because of the perishableproject," Mr. Sullivan said.The greatest challenge to further expansion of Maritime Terminal'sshipping business is the New Bedford-Fairhaven Bridge, Mr Bernier said."Every time a ship comes in and out, it is an obstacle,"he said.The Brazilian Reefer, which unloaded citrus in New Bedford earlier thismonth, had to dock at State Pier instead of Maritime Terminal because"she was too wide" to fit through the bridge opening, he said. Theswing-span bridge, which was built in 1906, pivots open to create twopassages. One opening is 88 feet wide and the other is 92 feet wide.The narrow openings make it difficult and dangerous for some of thelarger vessels to pass through, especially in strong winds, Mr. Berniersaid.According to Ms. Decas, New Bedford and Fairhaven are looking atalternatives to the bridge.The towns are working on the scope for an environmental impact reportthat would examine three alternatives: no action; moving the bridge; orreplacing the bridge with a double-leaf bascule bridge. Ms. Decas saidthe bascule bridge appears to be the most "common-sense approach"because it could be done within a more reasonable time frame and at amore reasonable cost than moving the bridge.It is too early in the process to know how much the bridge would cost,she said.The double-leaf bascule bridge would have two connecting platforms thateach would be lifted by a counterweight, creating a single, wide paththrough which reefers and other large vessels could pass. Ms. Decassaid the new bridge would "open up huge opportunities" for the NorthTerminal area, a 50-acre marine industrial site to the north of thecurrent bridge.The refrigerated cargo vessels that make port calls in New Bedford hailfrom countries around the globe such as Lithuania, Liberia and theBahamas.As it welcomes foreign vessels and crewmen, Maritime Terminal mustadhere to new security measures established by the MaritimeTransportation Security Act and Accountability for Every Port Act.As of Oct. 15, the Coast Guard is requiring truck drivers, vendors,contractors and other workers at certain port facilities in theNortheast to carry Transportation Worker Identification Credentials,known as TWIC.Mr. Bernier said adapting to the new rules has taken considerableeffort."It is challenging, but so far, so good," he said.New Bedford Police Sgt. Jill Simmons said her port security unit ispresent when the massive cargo ships make their way in the earlymorning from the outer harbor, through the hurricane barrier and downto Maritime Terminal.The unit sends out a patrol boat that follows the ship and communicateswith commercial or recreational vessels that might get in the way."Basically, we are running traffic control," she said."We go out and meet them and peek around the corners."The unit also is on hand in case anyone were to jump off the cargo shipand try to swim to shore, she said.Although it requires extra work, Sgt. Simmons said she is happy to seethe cargo ships enter the harbor."It's a great thing, because it's pumping a ton of money into theeconomy," she said.Contact Becky W. Evans at

  • Fairhaven Airport 1930
    by MLBaron on January 29, 2010 at 6:11 AM
    1222 Views - 0 Comments

    MLBaron turns back the hands of the clock with this classic from the archives. Fairhaven Airport was located were Titleist Footjoy Headquarters are now on the site. FOR MORE ON THE HISTORY OF FAIRHAVEN AIRPORT CLICK HERE: http://www.westislandweather.com/fairhavenairport.htm

  • Atlas Tack - inside an abandoned factory...
    by MLBaron on January 29, 2010 at 6:04 AM
    2237 Views - 0 Comments

    A short documentary of a controversial abandoned tack factory that held the town of Fairhaven on the brink of an environmental disaster for years. This 1987 award winning MLBaron video was instrumental in the EPA's eventual clean up of the site and remediation of the surrounding wetlands. Part 1 of 2

  • Atlas Tack-a look inside an abandoned fa...
    by MLBaron on January 29, 2010 at 6:03 AM
    2316 Views - 0 Comments

    A short documentary(Part 2 of 2) of a controversial abandoned tack factory that held the town of Fairhaven on the brink of an environmental disaster for years. This 1987 award winning MLBaron video was instrumental in the EPA's eventual clean up of the site and remediation of the surrounding wetlands. Baron is known for simple but clever effects.

  • WEST ISLAND,MA Lobsterboat rides Storm a...
    by MLBaron on January 25, 2010 at 4:34 PM
    1580 Views - 0 Comments

    This Fairhaven lobster boat "Francesca Rose" moored off Hoppy's Landing gets tossed about in today's south easterly gale. "Jan 25 STORM"

    ENTER FOR MORE DETAILS ON STORM : January 25, 2010 Gale System

  • GALE at West Island,MA 2 lobsterboats in...
    by MLBaron on January 25, 2010 at 4:32 PM
    1400 Views - 0 Comments

    These two sisters ride out the southeasterly gale with ease at their mooring tightly in place. The bows point towards the wind direction. January 25, 2010 Gale

  • Riding the Causeway into the Storm WEST ...
    by MLBaron on January 25, 2010 at 4:31 PM
    1646 Views - 0 Comments

    HEADED EAST ON THE CAUSEWAY AT THE HEIGHT OF THE STORM. A drivers view with the crashing waves just a couple of feet from the roadway. January 25th , 2010 gale system.

  • JAN 22, CONTRAIL-RADAR LOOP
    by MLBaron on January 22, 2010 at 10:15 AM
    1659 Views - 0 Comments

    JAN 22, 2010 AT 0910AM WIWS SKYCAM: This jet contrail distortion appears to be wind shear at the upper levels caused by a close off-shore storm system. Radar loop included at end of this short clip. High pres builds across New England today as a low pres moves E from Outer Banks. This low should become a gale center over the W Atlantic Sat.High pres should be across the waters Sat night. A strong low pressure should impact the waters Sunday night and Mon. Another cold front should cross the waters Tue. Another RADAR LOOP here.

  • Fort Phoenix, Fairhaven, MA 1982 Walking...
    by MLBaron on January 21, 2010 at 5:24 AM
    1544 Views - 0 Comments

    his 1982 video Features the late Donald R. Bernard, historian, author and Fire Chief. Bernard takes us on a walking tour of historic Fort Phoenix like no other tour guide could do. From it's early days in battle, and details of were important structures once stood, this vintage clip will take you back in time to Fairhaven's most historical sight and National Landmark. This was the first Public Access program in Fairhaven and was produced by Skip Tenczar, it was cablecast in September 1982. (Fairhaven no longer has a public access channel) PART 1 OF 2

  • Fort Phoenix, Fairhaven, MA 1982 Walking...
    by MLBaron on January 21, 2010 at 5:23 AM
    1502 Views - 0 Comments

    This 1982 video Features the late Donald R. Bernard, historian, author and Fire Chief. Bernard takes us on a walking tour of historic Fort Phoenix like no other tour guide could do. From it's early days in battle, and details of were important structures once stood, this vintage clip will take you back in time to Fairhaven's most historical sight and National Landmark. This was the first Public Access program in Fairhaven and was produced by Skip Tenczar, it was cablecast in September 1982. (Fairhaven no longer has a public access channel) PART 2OF 2

  • 1985 Fairhaven Fire Dept Fire Muster and...
    by MLBaron on January 19, 2010 at 7:50 PM
    1622 Views - 0 Comments

    Get fired up with this 1985 Classic! The Fairhaven Fire Dept hosted it's first fire muster in 20 years , on June 24, 1985. Fire departments from surrounding cities and towns participated in the action at Livesey Park, in North Fairhaven. A massive parade of fire apparatus and emergency vehicles rolled from the fire station to Fort Phoenix then to Livesey Park with sirens and lights blazing all the way. FFD plans another muster in 2012 - for Fairhaven's Bicentennial.


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